UCAS Tariff System 2017 Explained

 If you are planning to go to university soon, you will need to familiarise yourself with the UCAS system. Each university has a certain amount of points allocated to their courses, and your exam results have to be converted in order to see whether they are the right fit. The UCAS Tariff System was introduced in 2001 to simplify the university application process and help admissions staff make comparisons between different qualifications. Recently, a review of the system revealed that it did not include certain qualifications, and was very expensive and complicated. After a meeting in 2014, it was decided that a new tariff system should be used in September 2017. This new system takes into consideration vocational qualifications, making the process much fairer.

 

When you check the entry requirements for the course you want to study, there will be a figure stating that amount of UCAS points you need. In order to decide whether the course is suitable or not you will need to add up the points. The UCAS website has a tariff calculator to make this simpler for you. All you need to do is pick the qualification you have taken and the grade you received.

 

If you find that your UCAS points don’t quite much up to the ones on the university website, don’t worry. Some universities are flexible and may accept fewer points, especially if you are passionate about the degree you want to take and have relevant experience. Call up the administration office and explain to them how keen you are to take the course.

 

In 2017, the tariff will change. Whereas an A* at A Level used to be equivalent to 120 UCAS points, it will now be worth 56 points, while an A is 48 points. The table below shows this more clearly.

 

Grade

Tariff Points

A*

56

A

48

B

40

C

32

D

24

E

16

 

The UCAS points for BTEC Extended Diploma look like this:

 

Grade

Tariff Points

D*D*D*

168

D*D*D

160

D*DD

152

DDD

144

DDM

128

DMM

112

MMM

96

MMP

80

MPP

64

PPP

48

 

Fortunately, this will not make it any more difficult to get into university. It just makes the process a lot less complicated. However, this will impact AS Levels, which are now considered 40% of the value of A Levels. As a result, many universities will now only accept people who have completed the full A Level. The system also excludes Access to HE courses.

 

Visit the UCAS website for more information.

  

By Serena Reidy

Wed 14 Sep 2016